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FAIRS

COLLECTIBLE FAIR

COLLECTIBLE FAIR

BRUSSELS
BOOTH 0_3
MAR 04 2020 - MAR 08 2020

The 2020 edition of COLLECTIBE Design Fair in Brussels was held at the iconic Vanderborght building. The fair is dedicated exclusively to 21stst century contemporary design, giving Side Gallery the opportunity to show the works of designers whose concepts were at the forefront of creativity. Side Gallery featured a selected group of young international designers whose works promoted and explored the new ways of the design world, focusing on the investigation of materials, forms and techniques. Side Gallery presented works from Rodrigo Pinto, Lukas Saint-Joigny, Sophie Rowley, Sigve Knutson and the iconic Sabine Marcelis. Works from Chilean designer Rodrigo Pinto’s series “Tierras Hipnopómpicas” (Hypnopompic lands) were displayed in the Side gallery booth. The series demonstrates the materialization of constant dreams about territories in wear and tear by post-apocalypse. The question that is repeated during the creation of each piece, prior to the materialization, is how could it look, the place we inhabit or the objects we inhabit after total destruction. The textures and contours of each object reflect the wear and chaos that would influence each body. It is like observing the model of a schizophrenic story, where every detail tells the possible state of things. Alongside the works of Pinto were a number of pieces by the young Norwegian designer Sigve Knutson's who’s works could be defined as studies of humanity: all of his pieces have been shaped by hand and result in a clear relationship between the human hand and body. In the creation of his pieces Knutson prefers to use old, even ancient materials, and he believes that primitive methods are a way of searching for a connection to the collective past of the humanity. Hanging from the walls of the booth were two mirrors by French Designer Lukas Saint-Joigny’s. The pieces were from his Ore Collection. The collection features a series of different domestic objects that evoke Ore mineral. Throughout different shapes and colors objects look alive. This unusual dynamic aspect created by the shapes and their texture bring you instantly into a fantasy forcing you to let go your imagination.

Also hanging from the walls were the tapestries of Sophie Rowley's ‘Khadi Frays’ series. Rowley developed the technique during a recent one-year stay in India.


Also hanging from the walls were the tapestries of Sophie Rowley's ‘Khadi Frays’ series. Rowley developed the technique during a recent one-year stay in India. They are inspired by the Khadi Spirit, an Indian term which describes the state of illimitable patience.In ‘Khadi Frays’, the repetitive actions of conventional handweaving techniques were reversed. Instead of building up the material thread by thread, a solid block of multiple weaves forms the starting point. Each layer undergoes a carefully calculated destructive process, during which over 10 000 threads are patiently removed, leaving frayed finishes behind. Through eating into these material blocks, multi-dimensional textures are created, gradually dwindling down to the base layer. The differences in weight and tension of the warp and weft lead to subtle variations in shade and dependent upon the perspective angle, reflections on the surfaces occur. Through this technique simplistic and modest materials were transformed into intricate arrangements and elegant wall pieces, endeavouring to give a modern twist to textile craft. The experiments with stencils led to three different design outcomes made from natural canvas cloths, rough linen fabrics and cottons hand-dyed in Indian tumeric. Amongst the a collection of new designers to gallery were two standing lamps by Sabine Marcelis. The two lamps made of resin, neon and metal plate are a pure demonstration of slick and stylish material and colour experimentation that define Marcelis works.