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Josep Lluis Sert

Josep Lluis Sert

José Luis Sert, Catalan in full Josep Lluís Sert I Lopéz, (born July 1, 1902, Barcelona—died March 15, 1983, Barcelona) was a Spanish-born American architect noted for his work in city planning and urban development.

After graduation from the School of Architecture, Barcelona (1929), Sert worked with Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret in Paris. From 1929 to 1937 he had his own architectural office in Barcelona; works from the period include apartment houses in Barcelona, weekend houses in Garraf, and a master plan for the city of Barcelona. He designed the Spanish pavilion at the Paris World’s Fair (1937) in collaboration with Joan Miró, Alexander Calder, and Pablo Picasso.

With the fall of Spain’s Republican government in 1939, Sert moved to the United States and from 1941 to 1956 was a partner in Town Planning Associates, a New York City firm that engaged in city planning and urban design for a number of new or existing South American cities, including Bogotá and other Colombian cities, Chimbote in Peru, Ciudad dos Motores in Brazil, and Havana. Sert’s master plans for these sites were notable for their integration of natural landscape features into the urban building scheme. Sert made prominent use of patios and other aspects of Mediterranean architecture in his innovative designs for large groupings of houses. From 1947 to 1956 Sert was president of CIAM (Congrès Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne). He became a U.S. citizen in 1951. In 1953 he was appointed dean of the Graduate School of Design and professor of architecture at Harvard University, a position he held until his retirement in 1969.